The Master Of The Art

I’m always flicking through the pages of the music mags. Not much really has me stopping for too long. (Perhaps to my detriment? A slow reader’s curse that to be drawn in to read something, you REALLY have to grab their attention – going by my own experience anyway.)

I suppose I am finding myself studying Lou Reed quite a bit of late. Not in an involving and methodical way like I have done with others who end up deeply piquing my musical interest. Bowie very much became a study piece as much as a musical exploration. If I’d have taken an OU degree in English Lit. say, Bowie in some way or other could have ended up the subject of my thesis.

I can feel it possibly going that way now with Lou Reed. Exploring his work deeper. I am certainly starting to feel that sense of the story itself being as important as the music. But I think that is what usually pulls me in to those musical artists I admire and covet most. They are great storytellers, either by encapsulating the narrative verbally, or creating a visual palette of what is being told with an inner visual artist flair. (John Foxx’s description of Jim Kerr being the “the best internal movie director” always springs to mind. It is my favourite description of Jim as a songwriter and it is just so…”on point”, as the whippersnappers say these days).

I really am starting to get that there is much more to Lou than meets the eye.

The Birth Of Glam Rock – Classic Rock Magazine

A fabulous read…from the eyes of those involved and those on its periphery.

David Bowie – Ziggy’s Summer Holiday – The Making Of Pin-Ups – Classic Rock Magazine

I haven’t read it yet, but I’m looking forward to. I LOVE the Pin-Ups album! It devides Bowie fans…but I think he and Ronno make one of the best “covers” albums that exists.

Bowie And Eno In Classic Rock

Two short pieces on David Bowie and Brian Eno in this month’s Classic Rock magazine. The Bowie piece talks to Ava Cherry (I never knew she was so young when they met!) and talks about their time together and Bowie’s musical influences of the period, producing the sound for Young Americans and legacy piece Golden Years (shifted on to Station To Station – which always seems an odd fit on there and very much feels like it always belonged on Young Americans).

The Eno piece is an interview, predominantly about his art installations, but of course touches upon all aspects of his career. And, lovely words from Steven Wilson on Eno as well.

Quite a few other things inside it as well, including a mediocre review of a Mick Ronson compilation called “Beside Bowie: The Mick Ronson Story – Soundtrack” – compendium to the documentary, one assumes by the title? And, in another case of “you learn something new every day”…how the hell did I NEVER take in that Ronno plays on John (Cougar) Mellencamp’s Jack And Diane?

Well worth the outlay this month, peeps.

Repetition Is A Form Of Change

I always think my digital art has a “sameness” to it. I want it to have a style, a mark…not the “Priptona” mark I use…but a visual “signature” that when someone views it (without said “Priptona” mark in place) says “Yes, Larelle/Priptona’s done that one.” But equally I worry it veers on repetition and/or sameness. That it borders on bland. Banal. Safe.

Thank you to the other Brian for today’s inspiration…making me feel, at least for today…artistically…I am treading the right path.

(The quote comes from an article in the latest edition of Classic Rock magazine. I will post the full article later.)

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