Slow News Sunday Summary – May 19th

  • Cherisse in rehearsals for Kelly Jones tour
  • Sir talks writing songs and Govanhill library

“No news is good news” the old saying goes. In that case, Simple Minds HQ is positively drowning in good news! Lol

Just the one post this week from The Mister after last Sunday’s “I’ve woken up thinking about gigging” exciting little fluttering bit of info.

This week’s post had him talking about golden tickets and how luck sometimes falls your way. And how a knew piece of potential SM magic found its way to being formed.

Jim Kerr – do you EVER have a “bad day”? One where you’ve just…had enough? You feel a bit sorry for yourself? Stay in bed under the covers? No…of course you don’t.

*sigh*

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Anyways…

Cherisse is currently in rehearsals with Kelly Jones. Oh, I could do with a lesson from her right about now! I am losing what little semblance of faith I had in myself.

Won’t bore you with the details…but let’s just say I am feeling disillusioned again and Aunt Fanny is shouting louder than ever. She’s a f***ing bitch, but I can’t help feeling she has a point!

I KNOW IT WILL TAKE TIME! I just wish I could have some faith in my ability to actually get somewhere with it. I want to believe that in two years time I’ll be drumming with some kind of competency. But…no. I’m not sure I believe it.

Anyway…I’ve ended up making this about me.

No news is good news! Convince me…

P.S. Book cover shared is the one he shared from my having asked him what the first book he borrowed from the library was. Was he taking liberties? I am never sure when it comes to Mr Kerr. He’s a cagey (and snarky!) bugger.

Staring At (Photos Of) The Rude Boys – New Ruts Photobook

There’s a new Hanging Around book release featuring the photography of Virginia Turbett. The book in question features photos of The Ruts (aka Ruts DC – as they are known these days).

The book called “South Of Babylon: The Ruts 1978-1979” is available to pre-order through the Hanging Around Books site and is released on May 27th. Click here to order your copy.

Really looking forward to this one.

The Leopard

Brought up by a certain someone in a post talking about wanting to die under a lemon tree, thinking about his age (again!), being in Sicily, and loving a good story.

He always reels me in with his recommendations.

I used to listen to Radio 4 dramas a lot for a certain period. I still listen to the odd thing. There is a serial-based drama that has just started up again called Love In Recovery, about a group of people at a weekly AA group meeting.

I like the freedom radio dramas give you of being able to conjure up your own images and scenes. You can, quite literally, make your own film…paint your own characters exactly as you would want them (minus any vague descriptions of how a character looks to the novelist). The level of concentration for these is different to reading a book. I find it allows my imagery of things to be much more vivid.

This wasn’t a radio play but an abridged reading of the book. The way in which Alex Jennings read it was wonderful. I can certainly see why he was hired for the job!

Of particular enjoyment through the whole reading was the description of the days in which the newly betrothed Tancredi and Angelica would escape their chaperoned walks through the far flung quarters of Donnafugata. In the mind’s eye, such beautiful sensual images of soft pink skin, rose coloured lips (both male and female), fingertips delicately touching skin, etc, etc, quickened one’s pulse. Eluded to seductively, but all very much left to the imagination. Isn’t that how all the best written sex is? All the parts that you, as the reader, (or in this case, the listener) are left to imagine yourself? And of course in my current circumstance, my imagination ran amok!

I listened to all five parts in one sitting. Only breaking after part two to listen to the latest instalment of The Archers (some habits die hard).

I have never been to Italy, or indeed to Sicily…so my experiences of Palermo, Catania, the towering presence of Mount Etna, the deep azure of that “middling” sea are still somewhat a composite of things I see second hand…so far not experienced with my own naked eyes.

Perhaps that may change sometime soon?

I enjoyed listening to it very much. I may just download all the parts to it and share them here. It’ll only stay on iPlayer (ahem), I mean BBC Sounds for so long. And I’d like to keep it to listen to again and again in future – not have to rely on the Beeb to repeat it. In the meantime, if you click the image above of The Leopard – it will direct you to the BBC page for listening.

I think it may also be wise to invest in the novel, to read it in its entirety, unabridged.

I may also get back to listening to more BBC Radio drama.

Thanks for sharing it, Sir. As for the desire to die under a lemon tree? I’ll leave you with this…

Mars By 1980 – David Stubbs

Another book I am about to download onto my Kindle. I must have about 200 unread books on there now. As slow a reader as I am, I used to read regularly. At least 10/12 books a year. That’s not a lot for you speedy reading types, but that was a good pace for me…and MUCH better than current stats, which will be lucky if they equate to just a solitary book per year. Shameful! I need to change that!

Anyway, this extract was in last month’s Electronic Sound magazine. The book is written by one of the magazine’s contributors. Below is the extract from within the magazine, about the lasting legacy of Kraftwerk.

As a side note, Kometenmelodie 2 is now my absolute new fave piece of instrumental music. It never fails to make a massive emotional impact on me. It brings me to tears with its beauty. Electronic music emotionaless and devoid of anything visceral?! Utter fucking hogwash!

Spellbound Exhibition At The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Now the summer is all but gone (officially ended as of Saturday…but seasonally not really over until autumnal equinox – which this year is on Sept 23 – obv. always in September…but can fall between the 21st to the 24th), and with only a smattering of gigs left this year, my mind was thinking on to having a look at what exhibitions I could try and get to in the autumn.

And by a strange twist of serendipty, early this afternoon I saw a post on Facebook from the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. They have an exhibition running until early January called Spellbound…to do with things superstisious and supernatural. On their post, they linked to a Guardian piece by writer Philip Pullman, regarding the exhibition and its subject matter. An absorbing read. You can read it by CLICKING HERE.

In his piece he mentioned the book below. It sounded so intriguing, I had order a copy on my Kindle. Looking forward to reading through it. It sounds more than the sum of its parts by Pullman’s description.

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